Publishers in Oxford

It is easy to see why Oxford is the second largest hotspot for publishers after London: only an hour away from the capital, with a literary and academic background that is hard to rival, the city has countless publishers of all kinds, perhaps the most renowned being that of its famous university ‘Oxford University Press’ … Continue reading

Blackwell’s

One of Oxford’s greatest bookstores is undoubtedly Blackwell’s, whose name has long been synonymous with the city and its unrivalled academia. Whilst the chain now owns flagship shops in Cambridge, London Charing Cross Road and Edinburgh South Bridge, it was Oxford’s Broad Street in which Benjamin Henry Blackwell opened his first ever store in January 1879. In those … Continue reading

Oxford World Book Capital 2014

Hello again Oxford World Bookers, sorry for such a long absence – holidays and work experience following that have meant no time whatsoever to devote to the blog – but I’m pleased to say I’m back again and ready to do some last-minute posts on why Oxford deserves to win before UNESCO’s decision in early … Continue reading

The Hedgehog and the Fox

Over six hundred years ago Oxford University had its first library – in an upper room in the University church of St Mary the Virgin (now, less grandiosely, above the café in the church). Just over sixty years ago a group of people met together in the same room to form the Oxford Committee for … Continue reading

An imaginative way with words

There’s been lots of media interest today in children’s language – their inventive storytelling, familiarity with technology-related terms, and thirst for unusual words. It’s been sparked by OUP’s analysis of more than 74,000 stories written by children for BBC Radio 2’s 500 Words competition 2012. It just goes to show how vibrant language is, and how fascinated … Continue reading

Oxford Fiction – A Round Up!

Oxford English Dictionary

With the bid decision drawing close, I thought a last post to round up some great Oxford fiction would be in order as I go on holiday tomorrow for a fortnight: when I return, there won’t be long left until the verdict so some supporting information about the city in general and why we deserve … Continue reading

Eagle and Child and The Inklings

As a city with such a rich literary history, it is inevitable that there are countless places dotted around Oxford which boast a bookish background, some of which may not be so obvious. One of the best examples of this is the Eagle and Child pub on St Giles, meeting place for the infamous Inklings … Continue reading

Brideshead Revisited

Another Oxfordian classic which deals with class from a completely different perspective to Hardy’s ‘Jude the Obscure’ is Evelyn Waugh’s ‘Brideshead Revisited,’ whose upper-class protagonist, unlike Jude, did indeed have the opportunity to study at Oxford. Again weaving issues of class, marriage and religion, ‘Brideshead Revisited’ shares a further similarity with ‘Jude’ in its somewhat … Continue reading

Jude the Obscure

Set in Christminster, a fictional town modelled on Oxford, Thomas Hardy’s ‘Jude the Obscure’ is yet another classic that takes the city of dreaming spires as its inspiration. Widely considered one of the most depressing, the novel intertwines suicide, murder and the severe consequences of religious constrictions and was publicly burned in its time for … Continue reading

Writer’s block

Can you summarize War and Peace in a tweet? If you can, does that mean that Tolstoy wrote far too many words? Now that we can all tweet and blog, does that make everyone a writer? They say that everyone has one novel inside them, and one wit added that in most cases that’s where … Continue reading

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